CHANGE OF A WORLDVIEW

“A good teacher teaches people how to see, not what to see.” – Richard Rohr

 

I  really like Richard Rohr’s daily meditation – it’s out of the box thinking, apropos  for our modern times. Here below it is slightly shortened version of his past Sunday meditation.

 

If you are not familiar with Richard’s work he helped found the Center for Action and Contemplation in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He has been a Franciscan friar for 49 years.

 

Cheers,  Bruce

 

 

Center for Action and Contemplation  Widnow to outside  New Mexico - francis guenette photo

This window looks out to the courtyard at the Center for Action and Contemplation in Albuquerque, New Mexico

 

 

The Change of a Worldview –
Sunday, August 25, 2019

 

Today, every academic, professional discipline—psychology, anthropology, history, the various sciences, social studies, art, and business—recognizes change, development, and some kind of evolving phenomenon. But in its search for the Real Absolute, much of Christian theology made one fatal mistake: It imagined that any notion of God had to be unchanging, an “unmoved mover,” as Aristotelian philosophy called it.

 

There’s little evidence of a rigid God in the biblical tradition or the image of Trinity—where God is seen as an active verb more than a substantive noun. But many Christians seem to have preferred a stable notion of God as an old white man, sitting on a throne—much like the Greek god Zeus (whose name became the Latin word for God or “Deus”)—a critical and punitive spectator to a creation that was merely a mechanical clock of inevitable laws and punishments, ticking away until Doomsday.

 

 Center for Action and Contemplation 5, New Mexico - francis guenette photo

Center for Action and Contemplation – Francis Guenette photo

 

493px-RichardRohrOFM

Photo of Richard Rohr by Svobodat, via Wikimedia Commons

We need a new way of thinking about the universe and our place in it. To begin our two weeks on this theme, I offer a clear and concise description of our changing worldview from Australian theologian Denis Edwards:

 

Our theological tradition has been shaped within the worldview of a static universe. The great theological synthesis of St. Thomas Aquinas [1224–1274], for example, was formed within a culture which took for granted that the world was fixed and static, that the Sun and the Moon and the five known planet stars revolved around the Earth in seven celestial spheres, moved by angels, that beyond these seven spheres there were the three heavens, the firmament (the starry heaven), the crystalline heaven, and the empyrean, and that there was a place in the heavenly spheres for paradise. It was assumed that human beings were the center of the universe, that Europe was the center of the world, and that the Earth and its resources were immense and without any obvious limits.

 

Center for Action and Contemplation 56 New Mexico - francis guenette photo (2)

By contrast, we are told today that the universe began with a cosmic explosion called the Big Bang, that we live in an expanding universe, with galaxies rushing away from us at an enormous rate, that the Earth is a relatively small planet revolving around the Sun, that it is hurtling through space as part of a Solar system which is situated toward the edge of the Milky Way galaxy, that we human beings are the product of an evolutionary movement on the Earth, and that we are intimately linked with the health of the delicately balanced life systems on our planet.

 

Center for Action and Contemplation 2, New Mexico - francis guenette photo

Center for Action and Contemplation – photos by by Francis Guenette

The shift between these two mindsets is enormous. It needs to be stressed that most of our tradition has been shaped by the first of these, and even contemporary theology has seldom dealt explicitly with the change to a new mindset. . . . We have no choice but to face up to the ecological crisis which confronts us. Religious thinkers . . . are searching for a new synthesis of science and faith, a new cosmology, and a “new story.”

 

The Cosmic Christ by Sr. Nancy Earl , Center for Action and Contemplation archive

   Painting of the Cosmic Christ is compliments of the Center of Action and Contemplation

 

Center for Action and Contemplation 7 New Mexico - francis guenette photo

Center for Action and Contemplation – Albuquerque, New Mexico

Advertisements

11 thoughts on “CHANGE OF A WORLDVIEW

  1. Bravo! Yes – Yes – YES! Karen Armstrong, in “The History of God” – made the same argument – as have many others – It is the RESPONSIBILITY of all of us, to examine it, come together to evolve, grow, etc. That said, I’m still digging in my stubborn heels for living at the pace of ‘2.5 second, light speed” – cuz that life doesn’t leave time for contemplation, right? LOL

  2. Bruce, this post truly excited me! I have a close, very personal relationship with Richard Rohr. Now, I must tell you, he doesn’t know me at all and I have never met him, but that doesn’t change my original statement! 🙂

    I was able to hear him speak here in SoCal several years ago and at that time I started reading “Falling Upwards.” He so spoke a language that refreshed me and challenged me at the same time, and I dove in to study and absorb all that I can. In some ways he’s affected my faith and worldview more than any other person; certainly living person. I do hope to one day visit the Center in Albuquerque, and I’m confident I will.

    It just delights me to hear that you, too, feel a similar connection! I really loved seeing the photos. Thank you for sharing them!

    • Awesome Debra – I’ve heard him from recorded retreats, CD’s and even cassettes from way back and such, and he has been a real inspiration over the years …. and in such a diverse way…. for ecology movement, the enneagram, the 12 step movement, men’s awareness and the ecumenical movement… the list goes on and on. I’m so glad this piece and especially Richard Rohr himself touches such a deep chord within you.
      Peace, Bruce.

  3. “We have no choice but to face up to the ecological crisis which confronts us. Religious thinkers . . . are searching for a new synthesis of science and faith, a new cosmology, and a “new story.””
    ~ Thanks for sharing this, Bruce. I fear that our belief systems are so set in stone that we humans are unable to grasp the need for new ways of understanding our relationship with each other, our planet, and the Universe.
    ~ I’ve come to think of God the Creator as the Cosmic Force or Energy that permeates everything. The day that we humans could perceive with our inner vision that we are, in reality, composed of vibrating atoms–in essence, star dust–would be mind-blowing and liberating.

    May The Cosmic Force be with you, brother ❤

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: